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Tornadoes

  Before The Event     During The Event     After The Event     Resources  

After the Event

Injuries may result from the direct impact of a tornado or it may occur afterward when people walk among debris and enter damaged buildings. Because tornadoes often damage power lines, gas lines or electrical systems, there is a risk of fire, electrocution or an explosion. Protecting yourself and your family requires promptly treating any injuries suffered during the storm and using extreme care to avoid further hazards.

Treating Injuries 

Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured people unless they are in immediate danger of further injury. Get medical assistance immediately. Stop a bleeding injury by applying direct pressure to the wound.

Other Safety Precautions

  • If you are trapped, try to attract attention to your location.
  • Continue to monitor your battery-powered radio or TV for emergency information.
  • Be careful when entering any structure that has been damaged. Wear sturdy shoes or boots, long sleeves and gloves when handling or walking on or near debris. Be aware of hazards from exposed nails and broken glass.
  • Use battery-powered lanterns, if possible, rather then candles to light homes without electrical power.
  • Never use generators, pressure washers, grills, camp stoves or other gasoline, propane, natural gass or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, garage or camper - or even outside near an open window, door or vent.
  • Hang up displaced telephone receivers that may have been knocked off by the tornado, but stay off the telephone, except to report an emergency.

Updated March 2013


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