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Broward County > Stormwater > Video Library

The videos below highlight some local examples of innovative design strategies to providing stormwater management. These new approaches, often referred to as green techniques, help mimic natural processes and integrate stormwater management within the landscape to create multi-functional site designs.

Bioretention

Video One: Bioswales, commonly used near parking lots, are designed to maximize the amount of time water spends in a swale. Native plants, such as fakahatchee, aide in trapping and removing pollutants and silt from the runoff that flows into the bioswale. More...

A retrofitted canal incorporates native aquatic plants

Video Two: A retrofitted canal incorporates native aquatic plants that not only treat stormwater runoff, but also provide native wildlife with habitat. Also, recreational amenities, such as walking paths and seating areas, can be built around a retrofitted canal. More...

Dry retention areas are designed to catch and retain stormwater

Video Three: Dry retention areas are designed to catch and retain stormwater runoff on site, and even recharge surficial aquifers as the stormwater percolates down into the ground. These areas are relatively inexpensive to create when compared with other stormwater management practices. More...

 

A wet prairie is a type of marsh dominated by a variety of grasses, sedges and rushes

Video Four: A wet prairie is a type of marsh dominated by a variety of grasses, sedges and rushes. When compared to other wetland habitats, wet prairies are flooded less, but they provide innovative stormwater management and important wildlife habitat. More...

Bioretention areas, commonly referred to as rain gardens, can range from simple shallow depressions to more complex designs.

Video Five: Bioretention areas, commonly referred to as rain gardens, can range from simple shallow depressions to more complex designs. All capture, filter and store stormwater runoff. The use of native plants in bioretention areas increases the designs' function, enabling the plants to remove pollutants and nutrients associated with the runoff. More...

A series of treatment trains, including grassy swales

Video Six: A series of treatment trains, including grassy swales, a dry detention area, a raised inlet, a micro-pool and a constructed wetland, guide stormwater into a deep-water canal. All work together to treat stormwater runoff so that the water entering the deep water canal is significantly cleaner. In addition to providing stormwater management, these areas provide unique wildlife viewing areas. More...


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