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Phone:        954-610-2163 cell; 954-437-4040 home
Fax:            954-437-4040 (call first for fax)
Email:         mandalaworkshops@bellsouth.net
Web:           www.themandalamessage.com 

Services Available:  Single Student Workshop, Single Teacher Workshop, Series or Residency

 

Description of Services


Introduction to the World of Mandalas – Student Workshop
Mandalas are circular designs made by cultures around the world for centuries. In this Introduction to the World of Mandalas, students will take a fascinating, multicultural tour of mandalas, via PowerPoint, to see how and why they are used by various cultures as well as our own. They will also do exercises to increase self-awareness, and explore their own personal visual language of color, shape, and symbol in relation to the mandalas. A short field trip will allow students to examine mandala structures in nature. Discussion will help students relate mandalas to their own bodies and the world around them. After a unique meditative process, students will create their own organically shaped mandalas with color pencils. To finish up, students will write down a description of their mandala process and content and share it with the class. We will look for interesting similarities and patterns in everyone's work and finish with a display, and lively discussion.

The educational goals of the Introduction to the World of Mandalas – Student Workshop are:

  • to understand what mandalas are and how different cultures around the world use them, why they are important, and how they are present in our own culture;
  • to use and develop 2D artistic media and processes to produce works of art that illustrate personal experience, observations, feelings, and imagination;
  • to develop and understand one's own personal system of visual language and symbols;
  • to write down, in a coherent and creative way, a description of the form, content, and meaning of the work of art produced in class;
  • to see and understand that there is an underlying beauty, similarity, and pattern in the structure of all living things;
  • to gain a better sense of self-awareness, of one's place in the world, and of the world at large.

Several methods will be used to achieve the educational goals. Among them are the following:

  • show a PowerPoint presentation illustrating examples of the variety of cultural uses of mandalas, followed by discussion;
  • present and discuss a portfolio of sample mandalas produced by others;
  • do several hands-on exercises-in crayon and pencil--as a way for each student to explore and discover their personal visual language and symbolism. Discuss similarities and differences among students' choices;
  • take a short walk outside the classroom for a mini field trip to observe and discuss mandala structures first hand in nature;
  • use a body-based meditative process to access the imagination and personal visual images;
  • guide students in writing down a description of the form, content, and meaning of their artwork 

Indicators of progress include what can be observed in students' responses, questions, behaviors, and creations, and writing, including:

  • increased self-awareness, awareness of body structure, and of one's place in the natural world;
  • awareness of the patterns, relationships, and cycles in nature, in daily occurrences, and in life around them;
  • ability to participate, follow directions, and to use art materials properly;
  • use of imagination, creativity, and originality in visual imagery as well as writing;
  • demonstration of reflective thinking and interpretation;
  • ability to talk about one's feelings and translate them into visual images. 

Methods used to assess achievement of goals and progress include:

  • observe level of participation and engagement by students: see if they followed directions, asked questions to clarify aspects of projects, applied themselves;
  • check to see whether students incorporated ideas learned in exploratory exercises;
  • notice students' body language, verbal feedback, eye contact during presentation;
  • observe student work to see if it reflects and includes an understanding of principles presented;
  • request and read written evaluation sheets handed in by students;
  • notice repeat signups for workshops.

Grade Level:

3-12th

Number of Participants:

10-25

Duration:

1 workshop at 2-3 hours per workshop

Audience/Environment:

Disabled; Juvenile Justice, at risk, seniors, community-based, school-based, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

VA.A.1.2, VA.B.1.2, VA.C.1.2, VA.A.1.3, VA.B.1.3, VA.C.1.3, VA.A.1.4, VA.B.1.4, VA.C.1.4, LA.B.2.2, LA.B.2.3, LA.B.2.4, SC.F.1.2, SC.F.1.3, SC.F.1.4

Fees:

$400 per workshop, plus $15 materials fee/per student. CSC: 10% off.

Disciplines:

Visual Arts

Contact:

Phone:    954-610-2163 cell
              954-437-4040 home
Fax:
        954-437-4040 (call first for fax)
Email:
     mandalaworkshops@bellsouth.net
Web
      www.themandalamessage.com

 

Top of page

 

Group Mandala Workshop for Students 
Mandalas are circular designs made by cultures around the world. They are used as centering devices, in healing, for decoration, in architecture, and in the study of nature. In this single hands-on workshop session, students will take a fascinating tour of mandalas, via PowerPoint, to see how they are used by various cultures. They will also learn collaboration and communication skills, do exercises to increase self-awareness, and explore their own personal visual language of color, shape, and symbol. A short field trip will allow students to examine mandala structures in nature. After a unique meditative process, students will create a thematic group mandala together using color pencils. In the end, they will write a description of their process and content, share it with the class, display the group mandala, and follow with a lively discussion. 

The educational goals of the Group Mandala Workshop for Students are:

  • to understand what mandalas are and how different cultures around the world use them, why they are important, and how they are present in our own culture;
  • to use and develop 2D artistic media and processes to produce works of art that illustrate personal experience, observations, feelings, and imagination;
  • to learn collaboration and communication skills, including choosing a theme, while working together on a project;
  • to develop and understand one's own personal system of visual language and symbols;
  • to write down, in a coherent and creative way, a description of the form, content, and meaning of the work of art produced in class;
  • to see and understand that there is an underlying beauty, similarity, and pattern in the structure of all living things;
  • to gain a better sense of self-awareness, of one's place in the world, and of the world at large.

Several methods will be used to achieve the educational goals. Among them are the following:

  • show a PowerPoint presentation illustrating examples of the variety of cultural uses of mandalas, followed by discussion;
  • present and discuss a portfolio of sample mandalas produced by others;
  • do several hands-on exercises-in crayon and pencil--as a way for each student to explore and discover their personal visual language and symbolism. Discuss similarities and differences among students' choices;
  • take a short walk outside the classroom for a mini field trip to observe and discuss mandala structures first hand in nature;
  • use a body-based meditative process to access the imagination and personal visual images;
  • discuss possible themes for the group mandala and how to depict them;
  • guide students in writing down a description of the form, content, and meaning of their artwork.

Indicators of progress include what can be observed in students' responses, questions, behaviors, and creations, and writing, including:

  • increased self-awareness, awareness of body structure, and of one's place in the natural world;
  • awareness of the patterns, relationships, and cycles in nature, in daily occurrences, and in life around them;
  • ability to participate individually as well as a member of a group, follow directions, and to use art materials properly;
  • use of imagination, creativity, and originality in visual imagery as well as writing;
  • demonstration of reflective thinking and interpretation;
  • ability to talk about one's feelings and translate them into visual images. 

Methods used to assess achievement of goals and progress include:

  • observe level of participation and engagement by students: see if they followed directions, asked questions to clarify aspects of projects, applied themselves;
  • check to see whether students incorporated ideas learned in exploratory exercises;
  • notice students' body language, verbal feedback, eye contact during presentation;
  • see how well students work together in collaboration and decision making as a group;
  • observe student work to see if it reflects and includes an understanding of principles presented;
  • request and read written evaluation sheets handed in by students;
  • notice repeat signups for workshops. 

Grade Level:

3-12th

Number of Participants:

10-25

Duration:

1 workshop at 3 hours per workshop

Audience/Environment:

Disabled; Juvenile Justice, at risk, seniors, community-based, school-based, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

VA.A.1.2, VA.B.1.2, VA.C.1.2, VA.A.1.3, VA.B.1.3, VA.C.1.3, VA.A.1.4, VA.B.1.4, VA.C.1.4, LA.B.2.2, LA.B.2.3, LA.B.2.4, SC.F.1.2, SC.F.1.3, SC.F.1.4

Fees:

$400 per workshop, plus $15 materials fee/per student. CSC: 10% off.

Disciplines:

Visual Arts

Contact:

Phone:    954-610-2163 cell
              954-437-4040 home
Fax:
        954-437-4040 (call first for fax)
Email:
     mandalaworkshops@bellsouth.net
Web
      www.themandalamessage.com

 

Top of page

 

Earthworks Workshop for Students
From the ancient ruins of Stonehenge to the modern cropworks of Stan Herd to the mystifying and puzzling crop circles, we will examine artistic creations using the earth's materials by various cultures. It's a fascinating study of the significance and progression of earth art and a highly unique form of artists' communication throughout history. After a brief field trip, and using a combination of art materials and found materials from nature, students will make their own earthwork - either individually or as a group project. Lively discussion and debriefing follows. To finish up, students will write down a description of their artistic process and content and share it with the class.

The educational goals of the Earthworks Workshop for Students are:

  • to understand what earthworks are and why different cultures around the world produce them, why they are important, and how they are present in our own culture;
  • to use and develop 2D and 3D artistic media and processes to produce works of art that illustrate personal experience, observations, imagination, and an appreciation of nature;
  • to learn collaboration and communication skills, including choosing a theme, while working together on a project (if done as a group project);
  • to develop and understand one's own personal system of visual language and symbols;
  • to write down, in a coherent and creative way, a description of the form, content, and meaning of the work of art produced in class;
  • to gain a better sense of self-awareness, of one's place in the world, and of the world at large.

Several methods will be used to achieve the educational goals. Among them are the following:

  • show a PowerPoint presentation illustrating examples of the variety of earthworks produced around the world, followed by discussion;
  • do several hands-on exercises-in crayon and pencil--as a way for each student to explore and discover their personal visual language and symbolism. Discuss similarities and differences among students' choices;
  • take a short walk outside the classroom for a mini field trip to observe and discuss possibilities for earthworks and use of earthwork materials;
  • discuss possible themes and how to depict them (can also be done as a group);
  • guide students in writing down a description of the form, content, and meaning of their artwork. 

Indicators of progress include what can be observed in students' responses, questions, behaviors, and creations, and writing, including:

  • increased self-awareness, awareness of nature as a means to art, and of one's place in the natural world;
  • awareness of the patterns, relationships, and cycles in nature;
  • ability to participate individually as well as a member of a group, follow directions, and to use art materials properly;
  • use of imagination, creativity, and originality in visual imagery as well as writing;
  • demonstration of reflective thinking and interpretation;
  • ability to talk about one's feelings and translate them into visual images. 

Methods used to assess achievement of goals and progress include:

  • observe level of participation and engagement by students: see if they followed directions, asked questions to clarify aspects of projects, applied themselves;
  • check to see whether students incorporated ideas learned in exploratory exercises;
  • notice students' body language, verbal feedback, eye contact during presentation;
  • see how well students work, alone and together;
  • observe student work to see if it reflects and includes an understanding of principles presented;
  • request and read written evaluation sheets handed in by students;
  • notice repeat signups for workshops. 

Grade Level:

3-12th

Number of Participants:

10-25

Duration:

1 workshop at 2-3 hours per workshop

Audience/Environment:

Disabled; Juvenile Justice, at risk, seniors, community-based, school-based, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

VA.A.1.2, VA.B.1.2, VA.C.1.2, VA.A.1.3, VA.B.1.3, VA.C.1.3, VA.A.1.4, VA.B.1.4, VA.C.1.4, LA.B.2.2, LA.B.2.3, LA.B.2.4, SC.F.1.2, SC.F.1.3, SC.F.1.4

Fees:

$300 per workshop, plus $15 materials fee/ per student. CSC: 10% off.

Disciplines:

Visual Arts

Contact:

Phone:    954-610-2163 cell
              954-437-4040 home
Fax:
        954-437-4040 (call first for fax)
Email:
     mandalaworkshops@bellsouth.net
Web
      www.themandalamessage.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

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Introduction to the World of Mandalas – Teachers’ Workshop
In this Introduction to the World of Mandalas, teachers will take a fascinating multicultural tour of mandalas, via PowerPoint, to see how these images are used by various cultures as well as our own. They will learn mandala exercises they can introduce to their students to increase self-awareness, and explore their personal visual language of color, shape, and symbol. A short field trip will allow teachers to examine mandala structures in nature. After a unique meditative process, teachers will create their own organic shaped mandalas with color pencils. To finish up, members will write down a description of their mandala process and content and share it with other class members. We will look for interesting similarities and patterns in everyone's work and a lively discussion always follows. Q&A at the end regarding application of ideas and principles to their own students and classes.

The educational goals of the Introduction to the World of Mandalas – Teachers’ Workshop are to show teachers how to:

  • understand what mandalas are and how different cultures around the world use them, why they are important, how they are present in our own culture, and how to teach their students about them;
  • instruct their students in the use and development of 2D artistic media and processes in order to produce works of art that illustrate personal experience, observations, feelings, and imagination;
  • help develop their students' own personal system of visual language and symbols;
  • guide their students in writing down, in a coherent and creative way, a description of the form, content, and meaning of the work of art produced in class;
  • assist their students in seeing and understanding that there is an underlying beauty, similarity, and pattern in the structure of all living things;
  • help students gain a better sense of self-awareness, of one's place in the world, and of the world at large. 

Several methods will be used to achieve the educational goals. Among them are the following:

  • show instructors how, via a PowerPoint presentation, they can illustrate examples of the variety of cultural uses of mandalas; followed by discussion;
  • present and discuss a portfolio of sample mandalas produced by others;
  • do several hands-on exercises with teachers-in crayon and pencil--as a way for them to teach each student to explore and discover their personal visual language and symbolism. Discuss similarities and differences among their choices;
  • take a short walk outside the classroom for a mini field trip to observe and discuss mandala structures first hand in nature;
  • use a meditative process to access the imagination and personal visual images, which they can teach their students;
  • guide instructors in writing down a description of the form, content, and meaning of their artwork so they can do the same with their students. 

Indicators of progress include what can be observed in teachers' responses, questions, behaviors, and creations, and writing, all of which will be passed onto their students, including:

  • increased self-awareness, awareness of body structure, and of one's place in the natural world;
  • awareness of the patterns, relationships, and cycles in nature, in daily occurrences, and in life around them;
  • ability to participate, follow directions, and to use art materials properly;
  • use of imagination, creativity, and originality in visual imagery as well as writing;
  • demonstration of reflective thinking and interpretation;
  • ability to talk about one's feelings and translate them into visual images. 

Methods used to assess achievement of goals and progress include:

  • observe level of participation and engagement by teachers: see if they followed directions, asked questions to clarify aspects of projects, applied themselves;
  • check to see whether teachers incorporated ideas learned in exploratory exercises;
  • notice teachers' body language, verbal feedback, eye contact during presentation;
  • observe teachers' work to see if it reflects and includes an understanding of principles presented;
  • request and read written evaluation sheets handed in by teachers at the end of the session;
  • notice repeat signups for workshops. 

Grade Level:

3-12th grade teachers

Number of Participants:

5-20

Duration:

1 workshop at 3-5 hours per workshop

Audience/Environment:

Disabled; Juvenile Justice, at risk, seniors, community-based, school-based, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

VA.A.1.2, VA.B.1.2, VA.C.1.2, VA.A.1.3, VA.B.1.3, VA.C.1.3, VA.A.1.4, VA.B.1.4, VA.C.1.4, LA.B.2.2, LA.B.2.3, LA.B.2.4, SC.F.1.2, SC.F.1.3, SC.F.1.4

Fees:

$500 per workshop, plus $15 materials fee/per person. CSC: 10% off.

Disciplines:

Visual Arts

Contact:

Phone:    954-610-2163 cell
              954-437-4040 home
Fax:
        954-437-4040 (call first for fax)
Email:
     mandalaworkshops@bellsouth.net
Web
      www.themandalamessage.com

 

Top of page

 

Mandala Me, Mandala You Workshop Series
Beautiful circular designs called mandalas are used around the world as centering devices, in healing, decoration, architecture, and in the study of nature. In this series of 6 hands-on workshops--Mandala Me, Mandala You--students will take a fascinating tour of mandalas, via PowerPoint, to see how they are used by various cultures. They will also do exercises to increase self awareness, and explore their own personal visual language. A short field trip will allow students to examine mandala structures in nature. The first 3 weeks will focus on 2D mandalas and, after a meditative process, students will create their own organic shaped mandalas with color pencils. The last 3 sessions will focus on 3D mandalas using handmade paper and paint. Students will also write a description of their process and content and discuss. Culminating experience can be a group mandala.  With the interest and practice of mandala-making on the rise, it is important that South Florida have a specialized program in mandalas.

The educational goals of the Mandala Me, Mandala You Workshop Series are:

  • to understand what mandalas are and how different cultures around the world use them, why they are important, and how they are present in our own culture;
  • to use and develop 2D and 3D artistic media and processes to produce works of art that illustrate personal experience, observations, feelings, and imagination;
  • to develop and understand one's own personal system of visual language and symbols;
  • to write down, in a coherent and creative way, a description of the form, content, and meaning of the works of art produced in class;
  • to see and understand that there is an underlying beauty, similarity, and pattern of connectedness in the structure of all living things in nature, including our own bodies;
  • to gain a better sense of self-awareness, of one's place in the world, and of the world at large;
  • to increase self-esteem through the making and understanding of art. 

Several methods will be used to achieve the educational goals. Among them are the following:

  • show a PowerPoint presentation illustrating examples of the variety of cultural, architectural, and natural mandalas, followed by discussion;
  • present and discuss a portfolio of sample mandalas produced by others;
  • do several hands-on exercises-in crayon and pencil--as a way for each student to explore and discover their personal visual language and symbolism. Discuss similarities and differences among students' choices;
  • take a short walk outside the classroom for a mini field trip to observe and discuss mandala structures first hand in nature;
  • use a body-based meditative process to access the imagination and personal visual images;
  • discuss possible themes for the group mandala and how to depict them;
  • create both 2D and 3D mandalas with art materials;
  • guide students in writing down a description of the form, content, and meaning of their artwork;
  • display student artwork on a school or gallery wall. 

Indicators of progress include what can be observed in students' responses, questions, behaviors, and creations, and writing, including:

  • increased self-awareness, awareness of body structure, and of one's place in the natural world;
  • awareness of the patterns, relationships, and cycles in nature, in daily occurrences, and in life around them;
  • ability to participate individually as well as a member of a group, follow directions, and to use both 2D and 3D art materials properly;
  • use of imagination, creativity, and originality in visual imagery as well as writing;
  • demonstration of reflective thinking and interpretation;
  • ability to talk about one's feelings and translate them into visual images. 

Methods used to assess achievement of goals and progress include:

  • observe level of participation and engagement by students: see if they followed directions, asked questions to clarify aspects of projects, applied themselves;
  • check to see whether students incorporated ideas learned in exploratory exercises;
  • notice students' body language, verbal feedback, eye contact during presentation;
  • see how well students work together in collaboration and decision making as a group as well as individually;
  • observe student work to see if it reflects and includes an understanding of 2D and 3D art principles presented;
  • request and read written evaluation sheets handed in by students;
  • notice repeat signups for workshops. 

Grade Level:

3-12th

Number of Participants:

10-25

Duration:

6 workshops at 2-3 hours per workshop over 6 weeks

Audience/Environment:

Disabled; Juvenile Justice, at risk, seniors, community-based, school-based, afterschool, summer.

Standards:

VA.A.1.2, VA.B.1.2, VA.C.1.2, VA.A.1.3, VA.B.1.3, VA.C.1.3, VA.A.1.4, VA.B.1.4, VA.C.1.4, LA.B.2.2, LA.B.2.3, LA.B.2.4, SC.F.1.2, SC.F.1.3, SC.F.1.4

Fees:

$400 per workshop, plus $20 materials fee/per person. CSC: 10% off.

Disciplines:

Visual Arts

Contact:

Phone:    954-610-2163 cell
              954-437-4040 home
Fax:
        954-437-4040 (call first for fax)
Email:
     mandalaworkshops@bellsouth.net
Web
      www.themandalamessage.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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